• 22/11/07
  • Comments: 6
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Last week Catherine was interviewed by ‘the Guardian’ (article in 21 November) about our participation in the Fife Diet. The next thing we were invited to a photoshoot at Puddledub Farm with some piglets. I was telling the farmer about the difficulty of sourcing wheat grown in Fife. Of course, she said, we grow wheat here to feed the pigs. What about us humans I thought.

Days later Heather Mills McCartney was in the papers saying we should all give up meat to save the planet, cease consuming dairy products and drink rats or cats milk instead. She has a point, though I’m not sure about rats or cats milk. There is a dichotomy between reducing carbon footprints by only consuming local produce and eating meat in order to sustain a varied diet. Before starting the Fife diet I was vegetarian for the same reasons Mills McCartney has been promoting – livestock farming has very high carbon emissions.

Nevertheless I am comfortable with the change over. We don’t eat much meat, and what we do eat is organic or operates in a local sphere of distribution. It’s probably no worse than being a veggie and getting all your lentils from Turkey. I’ve not been able to get hold of a rat or a cat long enough to milk so far!

This weekend we went to Culross and managed to buy some apples grown in the orchard there. we also noticed they had locally made ice cream from Nelson’s Dairy in Culross. We didn’t pick any up because the tubs were too small to get home in time but fully intend to go back to the farm and try and get a supply , and to see if we can get milk (though somewhere nearer Kinghorn would bemore practical, rats excepted).

One thing I’ve noticed is that since we’ve started we have not been to the supermarket. We’re not in the 100% Fife food by any means as the local co-op is still useful, as are many of the existing supplies we have. I personally cannot give up wine, chocolate or coffee at the moment. I’d like at some point to be really hard core about it for a spell – just not yet.

This week we’ve eaten:

– quiche with romanescu (didn’t he used to play for Rangers?)
– Celeriac and beetroot rissotto (the rice was already in the house)
– vegetarian stovies (this recipe is well worth a shot)
– soups of made of various veggies
– egg and bacon on a layer of fried grated potato (a bit like hash browns)
– parsnip vegetable burgers with chips cooked in the oven

from Richard B

6 Comments
  • Impossible Songs November 26, 2007 at 20:33

    Mike,

    Thanks that’s god to know, I was worried it may all be an esoteric kind of mid-life crisis thing for singles and stereotypes but if kids are hacking it along with mum and dad then that’s impressive. I’ll keep watching the progress and I’ve already found the wed-links valuable.

    Jonny Impossible

  • fifediet November 25, 2007 at 18:58

    Hi Impossible Songs, the answer to your question is its a mixture of people – but many with kids, and contrary to the grumpy contrarian on the radio show – alot on low budgets.

    Mike

  • Impossible Songs November 25, 2007 at 15:45

    Guys,

    Heard about your diet on Radio Scotland on Friday and am interested. We are in the relative wilds of West Lothian but with Fife roots heading back a long way and so we wish you well. My question is – are many families, adults + kids in this or is it mostly (relaxed) singles and couples with the time and energy etc. etc?

  • valereee November 25, 2007 at 13:29

    Here’s a link to a report:

    http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Oct07/diets.ag.footprint.sl.html

    Val

  • valereee November 25, 2007 at 13:25

    An interesting fact about smaller-footprint eating is that in many areas eating =some= meat makes for a smaller footprint because much of the land isn’t appropriate for raising crops but can support pastured animals. Steep hillsides and rocky or poor soil can be used to raise animals while most crops require good soil and flat-to-rolling land.

    Val

  • fifediet November 23, 2007 at 09:57

    The idea that you can’t grow wheat in Scotland is a myth, I have it on good authority from a researcher at the McCauley Institute in Aberdeen (http://www.macaulay.ac.uk/)

    Maybe we could ask Puddledub to set aside some wheat for us?

    Mike